‘Start Here’: What’s ahead for public impeachment hearings

It’s Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. Let’s start here.

1. Impeachment goes public

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump and his Ukraine call enters a new phase with public hearings for several key witnesses set for this week.

ABC News Senior National Correspondent Terry Moran previews what to expect on today’s “Start Here” podcast and the case that Democrats are making, “At the end of the day, it does come down to that phone call and what President Trump was doing, was he essentially demanding… or was he defending the interests of the nation when it comes to corruption in Ukraine?”

2. Billionaire Bloomberg

“You want to run for president? That’s fine, but don’t think you can simply buy an election by spending billions of dollars.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sat down with ABC News’ Rachel Scott on the campaign trail, reacting to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg possibly entering the race and the impact of the impeachment probe.

PHOTO: ABC News Rachel Scott interviews with Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.ABC News
ABC News’ Rachel Scott interviews with Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

3. ‘What’s Your Warrior’

This Veteran’s Day, the U.S. Army is adapting to a changing workforce by approaching recruiting in a new way and promoting a different kind of military service-member.

The new recruiting campaign, “What’s Your Warrior,” is aimed at Gen Z and focuses on non-traditional roles in the military, says ABC News’ Luis Martinez.

“It’s a new take for the Army because typically we’ve seen over the last couple of years they’ve been focusing on combat roles,” he tells the podcast. “They’re still going to be talking about that, but now they’re looking to see these non-traditional roles.”

PHOTO: Veterans Day, flags at a graveyard.STOCK PHOTO/Getty Images
Veterans Day, flags at a graveyard.

“Start Here,” ABC News’ flagship podcast, offers a straightforward look at the day’s top stories in 20 minutes. Listen for free every weekday on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn or the ABC News app. Follow @StartHereABC on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for exclusive content and show updates.

Elsewhere:

‘Hateful messages’: A New York woman has been arrested for allegedly harassing a child with a genetic disorder, according to police.

‘Life has turned upside down’: An American father who lost his wife and two young sons in an ambush in Mexico last week spoke out for the first time in an exclusive interview with ABC News over the weekend, sharing his heartbreak and the difficult decision he’s just made to pull his family out of that country.

‘Executing a scheme’: Federal prosecutors have accused a Virginia doctor of performing surgeries on women — such as hysterectomies and removing their fallopian tubes without their consent according to court documents.

‘Experienced hiker’: A hiker who had gone missing while exploring a mountain in California was later found on top of a glacier, according to authorities.

From our friends at FiveThirtyEight:

‘How Seriously Should We Take Michael Bloomberg’s Potential 2020 Run?’: Bloomberg’s move is a big surprise given just how late it is in the electoral calendar. Now there are fewer than three months before the Iowa caucuses, and if Bloomberg does end up running, he’ll have to scramble to make the debate stage, let alone get himself in a position to win any states.

Doff your cap:

In the 2019-2020 season, between Los Angeles Opera, The Dallas Opera and the Metropolitan Opera, there are 53 conductor engagements. Of those 53 conductor appearances, five will be women.

That’s why Dallas Opera founded the Linda and Mitch Hart Institute for Women Conductors, a two-week residency for about a half dozen conductors and, now, administrators, which culminates in a concert attended by members of the public as well as officials, agents and managers.

PHOTO: French conductor Alexandra Cravero at the 2src16 Hart Institute at The Dallas Opera.Karen Almond, Dallas Opera
French conductor Alexandra Cravero at the 2016 Hart Institute at The Dallas Opera.

“Historically speaking, it’s a man on the podium leading an orchestra,” said Lisa Bury, Dallas Opera’s chief advancement and strategy officer. “There have been women, and very successful women, but the vast majority have been male, and in an era, i.e. the 21st century, it’s time as an industry to collectively improve the ratio and work together to achieve gender parity at the podium.”

“I have seen magical nights in the concerts of the Hart when you see women leading 80 people in the orchestra and the singers and just making our audience wild, and it was not because they were women. It was because they were incredible, capable leaders and musicians,” said David Lomeli, a Mexican tenor who is now the director of artistic administration at Dallas.

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