Pro-impeachment Democrats wary of Al Green’s floor vote push | TheHill

House Democrats who favor an impeachment inquiry said Tuesday that Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenDemocrats erupt over Trump attacks #RacistPresident trends amid criticism over Trump tweets Al Green to force impeachment vote following incendiary Trump tweets MORE‘s (D-Texas) decision to force a floor vote on impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpEsper sidesteps question on whether he aligns more with Mattis or Trump Warren embraces Thiel label: ‘Good’ As tensions escalate, US must intensify pressure on Iran and the IAEA MORE in the coming days won’t necessarily be helpful to their cause.

A total of 84 House Democrats, as well as independent Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashSC Republican Mark Sanford considering primary challenge to Trump Democrats erupt over Trump attacks Juan Williams: GOP in a panic over Mueller MORE (Mich.), have publicly endorsed impeachment. But House Democratic leaders remain opposed and want to build more public support with their investigations of the Trump administration before possibly moving forward with impeachment proceedings.

Green announced Monday that he would force a House floor vote on impeachment before lawmakers leave for the August recess. He forced two votes on impeachment in the previous Congress — in December 2017 and January 2018 — when Republicans controlled the House.

House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said he would “most likely” vote in favor of Green’s resolution, as he did in the previous Congress.

But McGovern voiced concern about a lack of unity in the caucus on impeachment.

The House is set to vote Tuesday on a resolution to formally condemn Trump’s comments as racist.

Green argued that the House should go beyond Tuesday’s resolution.

“We can do this, condemn the comments that have been made, and we can do this, impeach for the harm that the comments are causing to our society. Both of these things can be done,” Green said in a floor speech.

“We’ll figure out how to deal with it at that point in time. But we haven’t had a discussion about that,” Hoyer told reporters in the Capitol.

Hoyer said he has not spoken with Green about the threatened vote, but suggested that leadership won’t try to put up any road blocks if the Texas Democrat follows through.

“I think he feels strongly about it, and if he deems it appropriate to offer it, he’ll offer it,” Hoyer said. “I’m not going to try to discourage him. He has to do what he thinks is right.”

Still, Hoyer emphasized that leadership considers the push for impeachment to be premature, preferring to continue their aggressive investigations into the administration — including next week’s much anticipated public testimony from Mueller.

“There are a lot of things to do to expose the president and to change public opinion. This could be part of it, but a lot more to do,” Sherman said.

“What I’m waiting for is to see some Republican senator who takes their oath of office seriously enough to say that they would at least listen with an open mind should we bring [impeachment]. And in order to get there, we have to change public opinion,” Sherman said.

Mike Lillis contributed.

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